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John Locke quotes page 1

1632 - 1704, English philosopher

To love truth for truth's sake is the principal part of human perfection in this world, and the
seed-plot of all other virtues.
John Locke

Parents wonder why the streams are bitter, when they themselves poison the fountain.
John Locke

The only fence against the world is a thorough knowledge of it.
John Locke

New opinions are always suspected, and usually opposed, without any other reason but
because they are not already common.
John Locke

A sound mind in a sound body, is a short but full description of a happy state in this world.
John Locke

Education begins the gentleman, but reading, good company and reflection must finish him.
John Locke

It is one thing to show a man that he is in error, and another to put him in possession of the
truth.
John Locke

The supreme power cannot take from any man any part of his property without his own
consent.
John Locke

The people are the supreme judge of how governments fulfill their mission because it is the
person who gave them power and who care as such, the ability to revoke.
John Locke

Force is to be opposed to nothing but to unjust and unlawful force. Whoever makes any
opposition in any other case draws on himself a just condemnation, both from God and man.
John Locke

Fortitude is the guard and support of the other virtues.
John Locke

Virtue is harder to be got than knowledge of the world; and, if lost in a young man, is seldom
recovered.
John Locke

He that will have his son have a respect for him and his orders, must himself have a great
reverence for his son.
John Locke

He that would seriously set upon the search of truth, ought in the first place to prepare his
mind with a love of it. For he that loves it not, will not take much pains to get it; nor be much
concerned when he misses it.
John Locke

Good and evil, reward and punishment, are the only motives to a rational creature: These are
the spur and reins whereby all mankind are set on work, and guided.
John Locke

Revolt is the right of the people.
John Locke

Adam and Eve, and after them all parents were, by the law of nature, under an obligation to
preserve, nourish and educate the children, they had begotten.
John Locke

If man in the state of nature be so free, as has been said; if he be absolute lord of his own
person and possessions, equal to the greatest, and subject to no body, why will he part with
his freedom?
John Locke

We are like chameleons, we take our hue and the color of our moral character, from those
who are around us.
John Locke

Whenever the power that is put in any hands for the government of the people, and the
protection of our properties, is applied to other ends, and made use of to impoverish, harass
or subdue them to the arbitrary and irregular commands of those that have it; there it
presently becomes tyranny, whether those that thus use it are one or many.
John Locke

All men are liable to error; and most men are, in many points, by passion or interest, under
temptation to it.
John Locke

I have always thought the actions of men the best interpreters of their thoughts.
John Locke

Our incomes are like our shoes; if too small, they gall and pinch us; but if too large, they
cause us to stumble and to trip.
John Locke

The end of law is not to abolish or restrain, but to preserve and enlarge freedom.
John Locke

The knowledge of man can not extend beyond his own experience.
John Locke

The power of the legislative being derived from the people by a positive voluntary grant and
institution, can be no other than what that positive grant conveyed, which being only to
make laws, and not to make legislators, the legislative can have no power to transfer their
authority of making laws, and place it in other hands.
John Locke

Let us then suppose the mind to be, as we say, a white paper, void of all characters, without
any ideas. How comes it to be furnished? To this I answer, in one word, from experience.
John Locke

A criminal who, having renounced reason... hath, by the unjust violence and slaughter he
hath committed upon one, declared war against all mankind, and therefore may be destroyed
as a lion or tyger, one of those wild savage beasts with whom men can have no society nor
security.
John Locke

Is it worth the name of freedom to be at liberty to play the fool?
John Locke

Everyone has property in his own person. This nobody has any right to but himself. The
labour of his body, and the work of his hands, we may say, are properly his.
John Locke

But there is only one thing which gathers people into seditious commotion, and that is
oppression.
John Locke

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