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Edgar Allen Poe quotes page 2

In criticism I will be bold, and as sternly, absolutely just with friend and foe.
From this purpose nothing shall turn me.
Edgar Allan Poe

We loved with a love that was more than love.
Edgar Allan Poe

In one case out of a hundred a point is excessively discussed because it is obscure; in the
ninety-nine remaining it is obscure because it is excessively discussed.
Edgar Allan Poe

With me poetry has not been a purpose, but a passion.
Edgar Allan Poe

Perversity is the human thirst for self-torture.
Edgar Allan Poe

Experience has shown, and a true philosophy will always show, that a vast, perhaps the
larger portion of the truth arises from the seemingly irrelevant.
Edgar Allan Poe

I wish I could write as mysterious as a cat.
Edgar Allan Poe

That pleasure which is at once the most pure, the most elevating and the most intense, is
derived, I maintain, from the contemplation of the beautiful.
Edgar Allan Poe

The true genius shudders at incompleteness and usually prefers silence to saying something
which is not everything it should be.
Edgar Allan Poe

All that we see or seem is but a dream within a dream.
Edgar Allan Poe

I was never really insane except upon occasions when my heart was touched.
Edgar Allan Poe

It will be found, in fact, that the ingenious are always fanciful, and the truly imaginative
never otherwise than analytic.
Edgar Allan Poe

From childhood's hour I have not been. As others were, I have not seen. As others saw, I
could not awaken. My heart to joy at the same tone. And all I loved, I loved alone.
Edgar Allan Poe

That which you mistake for madness is but an overacuteness of the senses.
Edgar Allan Poe

Thou wouldst be loved? - then let thy heart
From its present pathway part not!
Being everything which now thou art,
Be nothing which thou art not.
So with the world thy gentle ways,
Thy grace, thy more than beauty,
Shall be an endless theme of praise,
And love - a simple duty.
Edgar Allan Poe

Some things are so completely ludicrous that a man must laugh or die. To die laughing must
be the most glorious of all deaths.
Edgar Allan Poe

The boundaries which divide Life from Death are at best shadowy and vague. Who shall say
where the one ends, and where the other begins?
Edgar Allan Poe

To vilify a great man is the readiest way in which a little man can himself attain greatness.
Edgar Allan Poe

There neither exists nor can exist any work more thoroughly dignified - more supremely noble
than this very poem - this poem per se - this poem which is a poem and nothing more - this
poem written solely for the poem's sake.
Edgar Allan Poe

That man is not truly brave who is afraid either to seem or to be, when it suits him, a coward.
Edgar Allan Poe

In reading some books we occupy ourselves chiefly with the thoughts of the author; in
perusing others, exclusively with our own.
Edgar Allan Poe

Sound loves to revel in a summer night.
Edgar Allan Poe

The death of a beautiful woman is, unquestionably, the most poetical topic in the world.
Edgar Allan Poe

But as, in ethics, evil is a consequence of good, so, in fact, out of joy is sorrow born. Either
the memory of past bliss is the anguish of today, or the agonies which are have their origin in
the ecstasies which might have been.
Edgar Allan Poe

How many good books suffer neglect through the inefficiency of their beginnings!
Edgar Allan Poe

A strong argument for the religion of Christ is this - that offences against charity are about
the only ones which men on their death-beds can be made - not to understand - but to feel
- as crime.
Edgar Allan Poe

Never to suffer would never to have been blessed.
Edgar Allan Poe

The nose of a mob is its imagination. By this, at any time, it can be quietly led.
Edgar Allan Poe

The mental features discoursed of as the analytical, are, in themselves, but little susceptible
of analysis. We appreciate them only in their effects. We know of them, among other things,
that they are always to their possessor, when inordinately possessed, a source of the
liveliest enjoyment. As the strong man exults in his physical ability, delighting in such
exercises as call his muscles into action, so glories the analyst in that moral activity which
disentangles. He derives pleasure from even the most trivial occupations bringing his talents
into play. He is fond of enigmas, of conundrums, of hieroglyphics; exhibiting in his solutions of
each a degree of acumen which appears to the ordinary apprehension preternatural. His
results, brought about by the very soul and essence of method, have, in truth, the whole air
of intuition.
Edgar Allan Poe

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