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Aesop quotes page 1

Aesop, one of history's greatest storytellers, teachers, and thinkers, has enjoyed a tremendous amount of longevity for his tales (collectively known as Aesop's Fables). These short, engaging, and almost always instructive tales have survived for thousands and thousands of years – and likely will continue to survive for the ages to come. Most historians agree that Aesop was born in 620 BC, somewhere along the Black Sea coast. Known throughout history as Aesop of Sardis, as well as Aesop of Lydia, much of the record from his early days has been lost to time forever. We've also learned (from Greek historians like Aristotle and Herodotus) that Aesop was a slave for at least part of his life, before he was freed and was able to act as an advocate for a wealthy man in Samos later on in life. There is much argument as to the death of Aesop in history, however, and historians remain conflicted about how he came to pass. Plutarch says that Aesop had come to Delphi on a diplomatic mission, ended up insulting the Delphians, and was sentenced to be thrown from a cliff based entirely off of trumped up charges. Nonetheless, much of this tale cannot be reconciled with historical fact, and is widely considered to be just part of the legend and myth of the man history knows as Aesop. Regarded as the author of Aesop's Fables, there is even some conflict as to whether or not he was the actual author of the stories – or merely the chronicler of the tales. Sometime in the fifth century BC a written collection of the fables of Aesop was published, with Socrates (and other leading thinkers of the ancient world) helping to bring a considerable amount of attention to the stories that would have otherwise been lost to time.

No act of kindness, no matter how small, is ever wasted.
Aesop

Be content with your lot; one cannot be first in everything.
Aesop

Union gives strength.
Aesop

A crust eaten in peace is better than a banquet partaken in anxiety.
Aesop

Thinking to get at once all the gold the goose could give, he killed it and opened it only to
find - nothing.
Aesop

Self-conceit may lead to self-destruction.
Aesop

Slow and steady wins the race.
Aesop

A peasant had in his garden an apple-tree, which bore no fruit, but only served as a perch for
the sparrows and grasshoppers. He resolved to cut it down, and, taking his ax in hand, made
a bold stroke at its roots. The grasshoppers and sparrows entreated him not to cut down the
tree that sheltered them, but to spare it, and they would sing to him and lighten his labors.
He paid no attention to their request, but gave the tree a second and a third blow with his
ax. When he reached the hollow of the tree, he found a hive full of honey. Having tasted the
honeycomb, he threw down his ax, and, looking on the tree as sacred, took great care of it.
Self-interest alone moves some men.
Aesop

People often grudge others what they cannot enjoy themselves.
Aesop

The gods help them that help themselves.
Aesop

It is thrifty to prepare today for the wants of tomorrow.
Aesop

Familiarity breeds contempt.
Aesop

Gratitude is the sign of noble souls.
Aesop

Do not count your chickens before they are hatched.
Aesop

It is not only fine feathers that make fine birds.
Aesop

He that always gives way to others will end in having no principles of his own.
Aesop

We would often be sorry if our wishes were gratified.
Aesop

Once upon a time, the wolves sent an embassy to the sheep, desiring that there might be
peace between them for the time to come. "Why," said they, "should we be for ever waging
this deadly strife? Those wicked dogs are the cause of all; they are incessantly barking at us,
and provoking us. Send them away, and there will be no longer any obstacle to our eternal
friendship and peace." The silly sheep listened, the dogs were dismissed, and the flock, thus
deprived of their best protectors, became an easy prey to their treacherous enemy.
Aesop

The unhappy derive comfort from the misfortunes of others.
Aesop

Never trust the advice of a man in difficulties.
Aesop

It is easy to be brave at a safe distance.
Aesop

He that is discontented in one place will seldom be happy in another.
Aesop

Better be wise by the misfortunes of others than by your own.
Aesop

Any excuse will serve a tyrant.
Aesop

The north wind and the sun were disputing which was the stronger, and agreed to
acknowledge as the victor whichever of them could strip a traveler of his clothing. The wind
tried first. But its violent gusts only made the man hold his clothes tightly around him, and
when it blew harder still the cold made him so uncomfortable that he put on an extra wrap.
Eventually the wind got tired of it and handed him over to the sun. The sun shone first with a
moderate warmth, which made the man take off his topcoat. Then it blazed fiercely, till,
unable to stand the heat, he stripped and went off to bathe in a nearby river. Persuasion is
more effective than force.
Aesop

Wise men say nothing in dangerous times.
Aesop

Fine clothes may disguise, but silly words will disclose a fool.
Aesop

A doubtful friend is worse than a certain enemy. Let a man be one thing or the other, and we
then know how to meet him.
Aesop

Adventure is worthwhile.
Aesop

A liar will not be believed even when he speaks the truth.
Aesop

Expect no reward when you serve the wicked, and be thankful if you escape injury for your pain.
Aesop

No argument, no matter how convincing, will give courage to a coward.
Aesop

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